The 100 years since the World War One & Muslims involvement

2.5 million Muslims involved during the World War One from all over the world

MFA Zaman: 11th November 2018 is the 100 years since the World War One was ended since the Armistice was signed in 11th November 1918 at 11 am. And 2.5 million Muslims involved during the World War One from all over the world. They travelled to Europe to fight for the allies. We should remember those Muslim Heroes because it is important to our contemporaries.

The First World War lasted from 1914 until 1918. It was initially between the Allies (Britain, France, and Russia) and the Central Powers (Germany and Austria-Hungary). These countries were later joined by the United States, Italy and Japan (supporting the Allies) and Bulgaria and the Ottoman Empire (joining the Central Powers).

During this time, several European nations had vast empires and the people of these faraway lands were drawn upon to assist in those war efforts. Britain called for assistance from the Caribbean, Africa, Australasia, Canada and India. Only India supplied 1.4 million troops. 430,000 Muslim soldiers were recruited from the Punjab, Bengal, and Kashmir (including present-day Pakistan). Some villages saw a high proportion of their men join the British Indian Army. Muslims (from Bangladesh, Yemen and Somaliland) also served in significant numbers in the British Merchant Navy.

About 885,000 Muslims supported the whole Allied war effort, serving in places like Africa (North and East), the Middle East (Mesopotamia), the Mediterranean and Europe. Nearly 75,000 soldiers from the British Indian Army were killed in action. Some, who were injured in Europe, were treated in Britain
Having travelled thousands of miles from hotter climates to very cold weather; it was difficult to adjust. But they carried on their services as dedicated soldiers. Same time they went into the trenches with Imams who lead the daily obligatory Salah (prayer). Also the hot halal food was served and prepared by the cooks. Sometimes medical supplies ran out, the soldiers used traditional herbal medicines from their home country to help injured soldiers. Also those Muslim soldiers shared their food with hungry civilians.

To mark 100 years since the end of World War One, the Armed Forces Muslim Association (AFMA) organised Commemorating A Century of Service And Sacrifice, the Inaugural National Muslim Service of Commemoration on 6th October 2018 at the Muslim Burial Ground Peace Garden, Woking. It is the original resting place for some Muslim soldiers killed during the First and Second World War. It’s location in Woking is significant, only a short distance from the UK’s first purpose-built Mosque. In 1969, the bodies of the men buried in the Cemetery were exhumed and reinterred at the larger Brookwood Military Cemetery.
Representatives from Muslim organisations and community leaders came together from across the country to show their respect to all those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the service and defence of the nation, regardless of faith.

Also The Rt Hon Earl Howe PC, Minister of State for Defence & Deputy Leader of the House of Lords, Cllr Will Forster, The Mayor of Woking, Major General Duncan Capps CBE, GOC Regional Command and current AFMA Champion, John Ellis, Chaplin in Chief Royal Air Force, Terry Whittles the National Chairman of the Royal British Legion, Baroness Pola Manzila Uddin, Luc Ferrie, founder of Forgotten Heroes 14-19 Foundation, Mrs Vera Mathys, Walayat Khokhar MBE, Dr Sheikh Ramzy and Mfa Zaman attended in this inaugural memorial service.
The service started with recitation from the Holy Quran by Cpl Abdoulie Jobe. Than honourable guests served the speech on the memory of Muslim soldiers in the World War One.

Speaking at the event, The Rt Hon Earl Howe PC, Minister of State for Defence said, Today we remember our heroes, especially the Muslim soldiers who joined in World War One. They struggled and sacrificed for a better world. We are grateful because they stood and fought for peace. They were in battle with people from all faiths. Even in the time of difficulties they never leave their fellow soldiers alone but they care and protect them. So let’s learn from them how to work together for a peaceful world where we can live together with peace. And we always remember them with dignity and respect.

Imam Asim Hafiz OBE, the Islamic Religious Adviser to the Chief of the Defence Staff and founder of AFMA said, The Muslim Community, as much as any other community, has a long and proud tradition of British military service. Hundreds of thousands of Muslim soldiers took part in the World War One. We remember the values and principles they gave their life for – justice, freedom and respect for others – values that people of all faiths believe in and that shape the ethos of today’s Armed Forces. Their sacrifice sowed the seeds for a peace and harmony that we must uphold and celebrate together in order to promote cohesion and respect. So it is our moral responsibility to remember our Forgotten Heroes who sacrificed their everything.

Baroness Pola Manzila Uddin said, The Muslims involvement in World War One made me proud as a British Bangladeshi. Because my family member went to this war for a better world which helped me to stand here. So it is very important to remember their contribution and sacrificed. I hope, we all work together to establish our Muslim Hero’s dream.

The Forgotten Heroes 14-19 Foundation spent 6 years research across 19 countries to acknowledge the Muslims contribution in World War One. The founder of Forgotten Heroes 14-19 Foundation, Mr Luc Ferrier said, I have read my grandfather’s First World War diaries where he mentioned his Muslims brothers who fought along with him. As a devoted Christian, It made me so queries to know more Muslims involvement in war. But there were very limited information. My team started to research and discovered the enormous friendship and mutual respect there was between these men and woman of all faith and none during war. After revelled 850,000 documents in French, English, Farsi, Urdu, Russian, German and Arabic, as well as hundreds of images in 438 different locations across 19 countries; we published a book ‘The Unknown Fallen’. It is a unique guide book to outside world where our core focus is on the human aspects of these Muslim soldiers, labourers and their brother in arms, lives, personal experiences and their faith as it happened 100 years ago. We include all Muslims who fought with the allied forces in the First World War. This book brought the opportunity to know the history of Muslims and build a bridge of peace. between people of all faith, youth and adults. It is very important to learn more about their legacy of mutual respect to avoid another war of all wars.

The Forgotten Heroes 14-19 Foundation spent 6 years research across 19 countries to acknowledge the Muslims contribution in World War One. The founder of Forgotten Heroes 14-19 Foundation, Mr Luc Ferrier said, I have read my grandfather’s First World War diaries where he mentioned his Muslims brothers who fought along with him. As a devoted Christian, It made me so queries to know more Muslims involvement in war. But there were very limited information. My team started to research and discovered the enormous friendship and mutual respect there was between these men and woman of all faith and none during war. After revelled 850,000 documents in French, English, Farsi, Urdu, Russian, German and Arabic, as well as hundreds of images in 438 different locations across 19 countries; we published a book ‘The Unknown Fallen’. It is a unique guide book to outside world where our core focus is on the human aspects of these Muslim soldiers, labourers and their brother in arms, lives, personal experiences and their faith as it happened 100 years ago. We include all Muslims who fought with the allied forces in the First World War. This book brought the opportunity to know the history of Muslims and build a bridge of peace. between people of all faith, youth and adults. It is very important to learn more about their legacy of mutual respect to avoid another war of all wars.

MUSLIM COMRADES INVOLVED
Soldiers
400,000 Indians (British Indian army)
200,000 Algerians, 100,000 Tunisians, 40,000 Moroccans, 100,000 West Africans, 5,000 Somalis and Libyans (French army)
5,000 American Muslims
1.3 million Russian Muslims
Labourers
100,000 Egyptians
35,000 Chinese Muslims
130,000 North Africans
200,000 Sub Saharan Africans
40,000 Indians

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Close
Close